• 11-12th Grade Social Studies Electives

    In their junior and senior year, students choose from a wide range of history and social studies electives. One elective must fulfill the Civics requirement for graduation and by Connecticut state law. Upperclass elective choices include:

    AP European History

    Grade: 12
    Duration: 2 Semesters
    Prerequisite: Course average of 70 in AP US History or 90 in American Studies or US History * and Department Approval
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    AP European History provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the politics, economics, philosophy, literature, art, and social history of Europe from 1500 to the present. Students are encouraged to be engaged in discussions and simulations as well as preparation for the AP exam. College-level reading and writing requirements focus on firsthand accounts of history and require analytical thinking.

    Text: The Western Heritage, Kagan, Ozment, and Turner; plus supplementary primary source readings.

    The Western Heritage AP Edition - text cover

    COLLEGE BOARD AP EUROPEAN HISTORY COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

    Civics

    Grade: 11 - 12
    Duration: 1 Semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester, fulfills civics requirement

    This course will focus on the American political system from both theoretical and practical perspectives, with the overall goal to be that of educating students to be active participants in the nation’s political, social and economic process.

    Text: GOVT 6,Sidlow and Henschen

    GOVT 6 - text cover

    CIVICS CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

    AP Comparative Politics

    Grades: 11-12
    Duration: 1 semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester, fulfills civics requirement

    This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. Coursework is calculated to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination and includes the study of the rich diversity of political life, available institutional alternatives, differences in processes and policy outcomes, and the importance of global political and economic changes. In addition, students will undertake seven country studies to prepare for the exam: Great Britain, United States, Russian Federation, Nigeria, Mexico, China, and Iran; and study the workings of the European Union.

    Texts: Introduction to Comparative Politics, Kesselman; Readings in Comparative Politics, 2nd Ed.; Additional readings & case studies from online sources, including library databases

    Readings in Comparative Politics - text cover Introduction To Comparative Politics - text cover

    COLLEGE BOARD AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNEMENT AND POLITICS COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

    AP United States Government and Politics

    Grade: 12
    Duration: 2 Semesters
    Prerequisite: Course average of 70 in AP US History or 90 in American Studies or US History * and Department Approval
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester, fulfills civics requirement

    This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the important concepts, theories, and facts of American government and politics. Coursework is calculated to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination and includes the study of public policy, government institutions, political parties, interest groups, public opinion, mass media, and civil rights. Political theory, and political beliefs, attitudes, and actions will also be addressed. Students will be required to complete the rigorous reading and writing expected in any Advanced Placement course in history or the social studies

    Text: Government By The People: AP Edition, 2009, David B. Magleby and Paul C. Light

    Government ByThe People AP Edition, 2009 - text cover

    COLLEGE BOARD AP UNITED STATES GOVERNEMENT AND POLITICS COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

     

    Cultural Anthropology

    Grade: 11-12
    Duration: 1 Semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    If people do it, anthropology studies it. Cultural anthropology is the study of learned human behavior. The study of
    human behavior cross-culturally has the combined effect of making vastly different ways of life more familiar, and
    making one’s own way of life appear less familiar. In essence, the study of the anthropological “other” teaches us
    about ourselves. This course will introduce students to the principles that inform cultural anthropological research,
    and to the value of applying those principles outside of the classroom environment.
    Course work will focus on textual analysis, detailed ethnographic writing and class debate and discussion.

    Text: Humanity: An Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Peoples and Bailey, plus supplemental readings and case
    studies.

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS

    American Law

    Grade: 11 - 12
    Duration: 1 Semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    American Law is a course designed to deflate the mysticism of the American legal system. Students will become acquainted with the basic structure of U.S. law, its moral and practical bases, and the manner in which it is administered in this country. Through case studies, readings, and simulations, students will examine the American legal system: its nature, operation and shortcomings. An important feature of this course is the classroom that is constructed as the actual courtroom, enabling students to duplicate the legal process. The course will employ a variety of materials ranging from casebooks to legal histories. Students will be evaluated on their written assignments, tests, and oral presentations.

    AMERICAN LAW DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS

    Text: Street Law, National Street Law Institute.

    Street Law A Course in Practical Law text cover

    Economics

    Grade: 11 - 12
    Duration: 1 Semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    Economics is a way of thinking about the choices we make every day. This course first covers the choices of individuals and firms in microeconomics, then explore the choices of nations in macroeconomics. As with any choice regarding scarce resources, the decision made all depends on the resulting costs and benefits.

    ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT SYLLABUS

    Text: Economics: Principles in action, O'Sullivan, A., & Sheffrin, S. M.

    Economics: Principles in action

    AP Micro Economics (fall semester)/AP Macro Economics (spring semester)

    Grades: 11-12
    Duration: 1 semester each
    Prerequisite: Completion of or current enrollment in Algebra II; for AP Macro Economics, students must complete a semester of Economics or AP Micro Economics.
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics are each one semester college-level courses that will follow the College Board Advanced Placement Curricula. Students will explore essential concepts such as measures of economic performance, micro and macroeconomic theory and policies, and international economics and the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. It is expected that all students who take the two AP Economics courses will take each AP Economics.

    Text: Principles of Economics, 6th Edition, Mankiw 2012

     Principles of Economics 6th edition, Mankiw - text cover

    Microeconomics Study Guide Microeconomics Study Guide

    COLLEGE BOARD AP MICROECONOMICS COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

    COLLEGE BOARD AP MACROECONOMICS COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

    Psychology

    Grade: 11 - 12
    Duration: l Semester
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5

    This course looks at the field of psychology with an emphasis on the individual and how psychologists deal with his or her problems with living. We will be looking at what psychology is, what psychologists do, and how they go about it. In the process we will look at different theories of behavior, from Sigmund Freud to Carl Rogers. Practical applications of these theories will be available for each student in discovering more about themselves and others. Problems each of us face such as conflict, anxiety, and stress will be discussed from a psychological point of view with suggestions as to how best deal with such problems. Mental disorders, ranging from mild depression to the various types of schizophrenia will be studied, as well as an examination of how the different theorists deal with these disorders. Projects, reflective essays, tests and quizzes are course requirements.

    Text: Understanding Psychology, Richard A. Kasschau

    Understanding Psychology, McGraw Hill, 2014

    AP Psychology

     Grades: 11 - 12
    Duration: 2 semesters
    Prerequisite: None
    Credit: 0.5 per Semester

    The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Coursework is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination, and it is expected that all students who take the course will take the test in the spring.

    There is a summer reading assignment/book: Slater, Lauren. Opening Skinner's Box: Great Psychological Experiments of the Twentieth Century. New York: W.W. Norton, 2004. The assignment: Read the book. You will be asked to lead a discussion on one of the chapters/topics during the first week of school

    Text: Meyers’ Psychology for AP, David G. Meyers

    Myers' Psychology for AP second edition cover image

    COLLEGE BOARD AP PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTION/CURRICULUM OVERVIEW